Symantec's Norton AntiVirus 2007

Germanwings crash probe turns on 'depressed' co-pilot

A policeman stands next to a police car in front of a house in Duesseldorf, western Germany, on March 26, 2015, during the investigation into the Germanwings plane crash over the French AlpsThe Germanwings co-pilot who flew his Airbus into a French mountainside, killing all 150 aboard, suffered from serious depression, a German newspaper reported, raising new questions over how he was cleared to fly. The black box voice recorder shows that Andreas Lubitz locked his captain out of the cockpit on Tuesday and deliberately sent Flight 4U 9525 into the Alps, French officials say, in what appears to have been an act of suicide and mass murder. The co-pilot sought psychiatric help for "a bout of heavy depression" in 2009 and was still getting assistance from doctors, Bild daily said, quoting documents from Germany's air transport regulator Luftfahrtbundesamt (LBA). He was still receiving "regular, individualised medical" treatment, Bild reported, adding that Germanwings' parent company Lufthansa had transmitted this information to the LBA.



Lawyer for Knox's ex-boyfriend makes final court appeal

Raffaele Sollecito's lawyer Giulia Bongiorno, right, arrives at Italy's highest court building, in Rome, Friday, March 27, 2015. American Amanda Knox and her Italian ex-boyfriend expect to learn their fate Friday when Italy's highest court hears their appeal of their guilty verdicts in the brutal 2007 murder of Knox's British roommate. Several outcomes are possible, including confirmation of the verdicts, a new appeals round, or even a ruling that amounts to an acquittal in the sensational case that has captivated audiences on both sides of the Atlantic. (AP Photo/Alessandra Tarantino )ROME (AP) — A lawyer for Amanda Knox's ex-boyfriend is making a last-ditch appeal to Italy's top criminal court to overturn the pair's murder conviction for the 2007 slaying of Knox's British roommate.



The Latest: Germanwings sets up family assistance center

An investigator carries bags with items that have been collected in the house of the family of Andreas Lubitz in Montabaur, Germany, Thursday, March 26, 2015. Lubitz was the copilot on flight Germanwings 9525 that crashed with 150 people on board on Tuesday in the French Alps. (AP Photo/Michael Probst)10:25 a.m. (0925 GMT, 5:25 a.m.)



Saudi airstrikes in Yemen target rebel stronghold in north

Shiite rebels, known as Houthis, hold up their weapons to protest against Saudi-led airstrikes, as they chant slogans during a rally in Sanaa, Yemen, Thursday, March 26, 2015. Saudi Arabia bombed key military installations in Yemen on Thursday, leading a regional coalition in a campaign against Shiite rebels who have taken over much of the country and drove out the president. (AP Photo/Hani Mohammed)SANAA, Yemen (AP) — Saudi Arabia bombed the northern stronghold of Yemen's Shiite rebels and other key military installations on Friday as a coalition led by the Gulf kingdom carried out airstrikes for a second day.



AP Exclusive: Iran may run centrifuges at fortified site

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, left, U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz, second left, National Security Council point person on the Middle East Robert Malley, 3rd left, and European Union Political Director Helga Schmid. 4th left, head of the Iranian Atomic Energy Organisation Ali Akbar Salehi 2nd right, and Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif right wait for the start of a meeting at a hotel in Lausanne Switzerland on Thursday March 26, 2015 during negotiations on the Iranian nuclear programme. (AP Photo/Brendan Smialowski, Pool)LAUSANNE, Switzerland (AP) — The United States is considering letting Tehran run hundreds of centrifuges at a once-secret, fortified underground bunker in exchange for limits on centrifuge work and research and development at other sites, officials have told The Associated Press.





Close Window